Andrea Hamilton AH Studio
Infinite Surfaces

Nature is so powerful, so strong. Capturing its essence is not easy - your work becomes a dance with light and the weather. It takes you to a place within yourself.

Infinite Surfaces No.1. Dye sublimation, print 80 x 60 cm.

Surfaces No.2. Dye sublimation, print 80 x 60 cm.

Surfaces No.3. Dye sublimation, print 80 x 60 cm.

Surfaces No.4. Dye sublimation, print 80 x 60 cm.

Infinite Surfaces

“Nature is so powerful, so strong. Capturing its essence is not easy – your work becomes a dance with light and the weather. It takes you to a place within yourself.”
― Annie Leibovitz

The materiality and the ornamental capacity of water are the ideas behind this body of work. Hamilton understands this group of images as an exercise in which it is possible to associate other meanings, feelings and narratives to this essential life force within and around us. In comparison to her project Line to plane, in which the horizon represents a limit that actually does not exist (that it is only an illusion), these photographs from the Infinite Surfaces series look down directly to the water and confront themselves with nature and its organic forms that interpellate our perception and recognition of things as if they were a Rorschach test.

Instead of trying to grasp the infinite, Infinite Surfaces capture a very specific moment, freezing the movement and transforming it into an abstraction with different connotations every time, ranging from detail to narration, and from geometry to blur. In a way, these photographs aim to reflect on the notion of infinity in a different way. It is not as much about the distance between the camera and the unreachable horizon, as it is about the distance in time and matter. Theoretically they are snapshots as they catch a very specific moment. Yet they transcend the instantaneous snapshot and produce a durational time exposure, an infinite representation that sometimes creates a dreamy image full of nostalgia, other times seems to represent a still from a moving image, and at others, serves simply to remind us of a close-up of a Monet painting.

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